Year 10 & 11 Curriculum

Learners at The JCB Academy work in teams tackling engineering and business problems. Each unit of work lasts ten weeks and covers the key content of the engineering qualifications. Learners also develop key attitudes and skills needed to succeed in the modern world.

During these two years, learners will study:

Examination: 100% Untiered examinations at the end of year 11

Component 1: Shakespeare and Poetry

  • Written examination: 2 hours
  • 40% of qualification

Section A (20%) Shakespeare

  • Macbeth: One extract question and one essay question based on the reading of Macbeth.

Section B (20%) Poetry from 1789 to the present day

  • Two questions based on poems from the WJEC Eduqas Poetry Anthology, one of which involves comparison.

Component 2: Post-1914 Prose/Drama, 19th Century Prose and Unseen Poetry

  • Written examination: 2 hours and 30 minutes
  • 60% of qualification

Section A (20%) Post-1914 Prose/Drama

  • The Woman in Black (Hill)
  • One source-based question on a post 1914 prose/drama on The Woman in Black.

Section B (20%) 19th Century Prose

  • The Strange Case of Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde (Stevenson)
  • One source-based question on a 19th century prose text from The Strange Case of Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde

Section C (20%) Unseen Poetry from the 20th/21st Century

  • Two questions on unseen poems, one of which involves comparison.

Learners are not permitted to take copies of the set texts into any of the examinations.

Topics covered in Y10:

  • Unseen poetry
  • Anthology poetry (selected poems from the anthology grouped in themes)
  • The Woman in Black by Susan Hill
  • Macbeth by William Shakespeare

Topics covered in Y11:

Further development of analytical approach to texts, with a closer focus on precise timing and exam board requirements in preparation for the summer examinations.

  • Unseen poetry
  • Anthology poetry (selected poems from the anthology grouped in themes)
  • The Strange Case of Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde by Stevenson

Examination: 100% Untiered examinations at the end of year 11

Component 1:

  • 20th Century Literature Reading and Creative Prose Writing
  • Written examination: 1 hour 45 minutes
  • 40% of qualification

Section A (20%) – Reading
Understanding of one prose extract (about 60-100 lines) of literature from the 20th century assessed through a range of structured questions.

Section B (20%) – Prose Writing
One creative writing task selected from a choice of four titles

Component 2:

  • and 21st Century Non-Fiction Reading and
  • Transactional/Persuasive Writing
  • Written examination: 2 hours
  • 60% of qualification

Section A (30%) – Reading
Understanding of two extracts (about 900-1200 words in total) of high-quality non-fiction writing, one from the 19th century, the other from the 21st century, assessed through a range of structured questions.

Section B (30%) – Writing
Two compulsory transactional/persuasive writing tasks

Component 3:

  • Speaking and Listening Assessment
  • Non-exam assessment
  • Unweighted

One presentation/speech, including responses to questions and feedback.

Achievement in Spoken Language will be reported as part of the qualification, but it will not form part of the final mark and grade.

Topics covered in Y10:

  • Functional and transactional writing
  • Creative writing
  • Speaking and Listening
  • Non-fiction and fiction reading
  • 19th Century non-fiction reading

Topics covered in Y11:

Further development of topics covered during Y10, with a closer focus on precise timing and exam board requirements in preparation for the summer examinations.

  • Functional and transactional writing
  • Creative writing
  • Speaking and Listening
  • Non-fiction and fiction reading
  • 19th Century non-fiction reading

Examination Board: EDEXCEL
Examination: 100% exam

Topics Covered:

Number

Decimals, Place value and Rounding:

  • Find the upper and lower bounds of more difficult calculations with quantities given to a various degrees of accuracy
  • Find the upper and lower bounds of more difficult calculations with quantities given to a various degrees of accuracy
  • Round to a given number of significant figures
  • Find the upper and lower bounds of simple calculations (addition and subtraction) involving quantities given to a particular degree of accuracy
  • Estimate answers to calculations

Properties of Number:

  • Find the least common multiple (LCM) of two or more numbers
  • Find the highest common factor (HCF) of two or more numbersFind the highest common

Percentages:

  • Work out reverse percentage problems
  • Understand how to use successive percentages
  • Work out compound interest

FDP, Ratio and Proportion:

  • Solve direct and inverse proportion problems
  • Interpret the graphs of direct and inverse proportion relationships
  • Convert recurring decimals to fractions and fractions to recurring decimals
  • Identify recurring and terminating decimals
  • Calculate proportional changes using a multiplier

Powers, Indices, Standard Form and Surds:

  • Simplify surds, such as 4(3 + √3) and (2 – √3)(4 + √3) in the form a + b√3
  • Use index notation and index laws for fractional powers ie. 〖16〗^□(3/4)
  • Rationalise the denominator of a surd such as 2/√5
  • Use index notation and index laws for simple fractional powers such as 〖16〗^□(1/4)
  • Use index notation and index laws for simple negative powers such as 2-3
  • Convert between ordinary and standard index form representations
  • Use standard index form with and without a calculator

Fractions:

  • Do calculations with mixed numbers
  • Do calculations with simple fractions involving division

Algebra

  • Expressions and Equations:
  • Simplify harder rational expressions
  • Solve fractional linear equations with the unknown in the denominator such as 4/(x+2)+3/(2x-1)=2
  • Solve harder quadratic equations (a≠1) such as 5×2 -3x + 5 = 0 by using the quadratic formula
  • Simplify quadratic expressions by completing the square
  • Use completing the square to solve quadratic equations
  • Use completing the square to find maximum and minimum values
  • Solve a pair of simultaneous equations where one is linear and one is non-linear such as x + 4y = 15 and x2 + y2 = 9
  • Factorise harder quadratic expressions (a > 1)
  • Solve quadratic equations (a=1) such as x2 -3x + 5 = 0 by using the quadratic formula
  • Solve a pair of simultaneous equations where one is linear and one is non-linear such as y = 3x – 5 and y = x2
  • Solve quadratic equations such as x2+ 6x+ 8=0 by factorisation
  • Solve a pair of simultaneous equations in two unknowns such as 2x+y=5 and 3x+2y = 4
  • Simplify rational expressions involving quadratic expressions
  • Solve fractional linear equations such as (2x-1)/6+(x+3)/3=5/2
  • Expand and simplify two expressions of the form (x ± n)
  • Factorise quadratic expressions

Inequalities and Formulae:

  • Rearrange formulae where the variable appears twice
  • Rearrange formulae that include brackets, fractions and square roots
  • Rearrange linear formulae such as s = 4q – 7
  • Solve inequalities such as 3x < 9 and 12 ≤ 3n < 20

Sequences:

  • Write the nth term of a quadratic sequence or a series of diagrams
  • Write the nth term of a sequence or a series of diagrams
  • Write the terms of a sequence or a series of diagrams given the nth term

Graphs:

  • Plot and sketch graphs of exponential functions
  • Recognise the shapes of graphs of functions
  • Transform the graphs of y = f(x), using the transformations
  • y = f(x) + a, y = f(x + a), y = f (ax) and y = af(x)
  • Solve simultaneous equations graphically, such as y = 2x–1 and x2 + y2 = 13
  • Explore the gradients of perpendicular straight-line graphs
  • Use the points of intersection of a quadratic graph such as
  • y = x2 – 2x – 4 with lines such as y = 2x + 1 to solve equations like x2 – 2x – 4 = 2x + 1
  • Construct the graphs of loci, including the circle x2 + y2 = r2
  • Solve simultaneous equations graphically, such as y = x – 1 and x2 + y2 = 9
  • Explore the gradients of parallel straight-line graphs
  • Solve a set of linear inequalities in 2 variables by representing the solution as a region on a graph
  • Know that each equation can be represented by a line on a graph and that the point of intersection of the lines is the solution
  • Complete tables for, and draw graphs of cubic functions
  • Use cubic graphs to solve equations
  • Complete tables for, and draw graphs of reciprocal functions
  • Use reciprocal graphs to solve equations

Geometry

Perimeter, Area and Volume:

  • Find the volume of the frustum of a truncated cone
  • Calculate the lengths of circular arcs
  • Calculate the areas of sectors
  • Calculate the surface areas of cylinders, cones and spheres
  • Calculate the volumes of cylinders, cones and spheres
  • Compare areas and volumes of enlarged shapes
  • Find the area of a 2-D shape, given the area of a similar shape and the ratio
  • Find the volume of a 3-D solid, given the volume of a similar solid and the ratio
  • Distinguish between formulae for perimeter, area and volume by considering dimensions

Speed, Distance, Time:

  • Interpret velocity–time graphs
  • Discuss and interpret graphs modelling real situations

Angles:

  • Use trigonometry to find sides and angles in three dimensions
  • Find the angle between a line and a plane
  • Understand the graphs of trigonometric functions for angles of any size
  • Solve more difficult vector geometry problems
  • Prove the angle properties of a circle
  • Prove the tangent / chord properties of a circle
  • Use and prove the alternate segment theorem
  • Add, subtract and multiply vectors to solve vector geometry problems
  • Understand the relationship between parallel and perpendicular vectors
  • Use Pythagoras’ theorem in 3-D problems
  • Sketch and draw trigonometric graphs
  • Use the sine rule to find the missing sides and missing angles in any triangle
  • Use the cosine rule to find the missing sides and missing angles in any triangle
  • Use the formula for the area of a non right-angled triangle
  • Use the angle properties of a circle
  • Use the tangent / chord properties of a circle
  • Find the distance between two points from their coordinates
  • Use sine, cosine and tangent to calculate an angle in a right-angled triangle
  • Use sine, cosine and tangent to calculate a side in a right-angled triangle

 

Properties of Shapes and Objects:

  • Prove that two triangles are congruent
  • Use the conditions for congruent triangles in formal geometric proofs
  • Match sides and angles of similar triangles, given some dimensions

Constructions:

  • Prove the construction theorems
  • Construct the perpendicular bisector of a line
  • Construct the perpendicular from a point to a line
  • Construct the perpendicular from a point on a line
  • Construct angles of 60° and 90°
  • Construct the bisector of an angle
  • Construct accurately loci, such as those of points equidistant from two fixed points

Transformations:

  • Enlarge a shape by a negative scale factor
  • Reflect shapes in the lines y = x and y = –x
  • Rotate shapes about any point
  • Describe fully reflections and rotations about any point

Statistics and Probability

Collecting Data and Sampling:

  • Use stratified sampling methods
  • Identify possible sources of bias in the design and use of data collection sheets & questionnaires
  • Specify hypotheses and test them

Averages:

  • Construct a time series graph
  • Use the trend line to estimate other values
  • Find the mean for grouped data
  • Find the median and modal class for grouped data
  • Use measures of average and range to compare distributions and make inferences

Constructing and Interpreting Charts and Graphs:

  • Construct and interpret a histogram including unequal class intervals
  • Construct and interpret a cumulative frequency diagram
  • Use a cumulative frequency diagram to estimate the median and interquartile range
  • Construct and interpret a box plot
  • Compare two sets of data using box plots

Probability:

  • Draw tree diagrams and use them to find probabilities of successive dependent events
  • Understand dependent and independent outcomes
  • Understand probabilities associated with mutually exclusive events
  • Use tree diagrams to find probabilities of successive independent events
  • Use relative frequency to find probabilities
  • Complete a tree diagram

Examination Board: AQA
Examination: 100% exam at the end of year 11

Assessments

Paper 1:

What’s assessed
Topics 1–5: Atomic structure and the periodic table; Bonding, structure, and the properties of matter; Quantitative chemistry, Chemical changes; and Energy changes.

How it’s assessed

  • Written exam: 1 hour 45 minutes
  • Foundation and Higher Tier
  • 100 marks
  • 50% of GCSE

Questions
Multiple choice, structured, closed short answer and open response.

Paper 2:

What’s assessed
Topics 6–10: The rate and extent of chemical change; Organic chemistry; Chemical analysis, Chemistry of the atmosphere; and Using resources.

How it’s assessed

  • Written exam: 1 hour 45 minutes
  • Foundation and Higher Tier
  • 100 marks
  • 50% of GCSE

Questions
Multiple choice, structured, closed short answer and open response.

Topics Covered in year 10:

  • Atomic structure and the periodic table
  • Bonding, structure, and the properties of matter
  • Quantitative chemistry
  • Chemical changes
  • Energy changes

Topics Covered in year 11:

  • The rate and extent of chemical change
  • Organic chemistry
  • Chemical analysis
  • Chemistry of the atmosphere
  • Using resources

Examination Board: AQA
Examination: 100% exam at the end of year 11

Assessments

Paper 1

What’s assessed
Topics 1–4: Cell biology; Organisation; Infection and response; and Bioenergetics.

How it’s assessed

  • Written exam: 1 hour 45 minutes
  • Foundation and Higher Tier
  • 100 marks
  • 50% of GCSE

Questions

  • Multiple choice, structured, closed short answer and open response.

Paper 2

What’s assessed
Topics 5–7: Homeostasis and response; Inheritance, variation and evolution; and Ecology.

How it’s assessed

  • Written exam: 1 hour 45 minutes
  • Foundation and Higher Tier
  • 100 marks
  • 50% of GCSE

Questions
Multiple choice, structured, closed short answer and open response.

Topics Covered in year 10:

  • Cell biology
  • Organisation
  • Infection and response
  • Bioenergetics

Examination Board: AQA
Examination: 100% exam at the end of year 11

Assessments

Paper 1:

What’s assessed
Topics 1-4: Energy; Electricity; Particle model of matter; and Atomic structure.

How it’s assessed

  • Written exam: 1 hour 45 minutes
  • Foundation and Higher Tier
  • 100 marks
  • 50% of GCSE

Questions
Multiple choice, structured, closed short answer and open response.

Paper 2:

What’s assessed
Topics 5-8: forces; waves; magnetism and electromagnetism; and space physics.

Questions in paper 2 may draw on an understanding of energy changes and transfers due to heating, mechanical and electrical work and the concept of energy conservation from energy and electricity.

How it’s assessed

  • Written exam: 1 hour 45 minutes
  • Foundation and Higher Tier
  • 100 marks
  • 50% of GCSE

Questions
Multiple choice, structured, closed short answer and open response.

Examination Board: AQA
Examination: 100% exam at the end of year 11

Assessments

There are six papers: two biology, two chemistry and two physics. Each of the papers will assess knowledge and understanding from distinct topic areas.

Biology Paper 1

What’s assessed
Biology topics 1–4: Cell Biology; Organisation; Infection and response; and Bioenergetics.

How it’s assessed

  • Written exam: 1 hour 15 minutes
  • Foundation and Higher Tier
  • 70 marks
  • 16.7% of GCSE

Questions
Multiple choice, structured, closed short answer, and open response.

Biology Paper 2

What’s assessed
Biology topics 5–7: Homeostasis and response; Inheritance, variation and evolution; and Ecology.

How it’s assessed

  • Written exam: 1 hour 15 minutes
  • Foundation and Higher Tier
  • 70 marks
  • 16.7% of GCSE

Questions
Multiple choice, structured, closed short answer, and open response.

Chemistry Paper 1

What’s assessed
Chemistry topics 8–12: Atomic structure and the periodic table; Bonding, structure, and the properties of matter; Quantitative chemistry; Chemical changes; and Energy changes.

How it’s assessed

  • Written exam: 1 hour 15 minutes
  • Foundation and Higher Tier
  • 70 marks
  • 16.7% of GCSE

Questions
Multiple choice, structured, closed short answer, and open response.

Chemistry Paper 2

What’s assessed
Chemistry topics 13–17: The rate and extent of chemical change; Organic chemistry; Chemical analysis; Chemistry of the atmosphere; and Using resources.

How it’s assessed

  • Written exam: 1 hour 15 minutes
  • Foundation and Higher Tier
  • 70 marks
  • 16.7% of GCSE

Questions
Multiple choice, structured, closed short answer, and open response.

Physics Paper 1

What’s assessed
Physics topics 18–21: Energy; Electricity; Particle model of matter; and Atomic structure.

How it’s assessed

  • Written exam: 1 hour 15 minutes
  • Foundation and Higher Tier
  • 70 marks
  • 16.7% of GCSE

Questions
Multiple choice, structured, closed short answer, and open response.

Physics Paper 2

What’s assessed
Physics topics 22–24: Forces; Waves; and Magnetism and electromagnetism

How it’s assessed

  • Written exam: 1 hour 15 minutes
  • Foundation and Higher Tier
  • 70 marks
  • 16.7% of GCSE

Questions
Multiple choice, structured, closed short answer, and open response.

Topics Covered in Y10:

Biology

  • Cell biology
  • Organisation
  • Infection and response
  • Bioenergetics

Chemistry

  • Atomic structure and the periodic table
  • Bonding, structure, and the properties of matter
  • Quantitative chemistry
  • Chemical changes
  • Energy changes

Physics

  • Energy
  • Electricity
  • Particle model of matter
  • Atomic structure

Topics Covered in Y11:

Biology

  • Homeostasis and response
  • Inheritance, variation and evolution
  • Ecology

Chemistry

  • The rate and extent of chemical change
  • Organic chemistry
  • Chemical analysis
  • Chemistry of the atmosphere
  • Using resources

Physics

  • Forces
  • Waves
  • Magnetism and electromagnetism

Examination: 100% exam at the end of year 11

  • 2 years (fast track)
  • GCSE

How it’s assessed

  • No Coursework – 100% Exam Based
  • 25% Listening, 25% Writing, 25% Reading, 25% Speaking
  • Some questions will be in German
  • Literary extracts
  • Short translation in writing paper
  • Speaking assessment in April/May
  • No dictionaries allowed

Writing

  • 45 minutes (25%) (Includes a translation and two open questions to answer)

Speaking

  • 10 – 12 minutes. 12 minutes preparation time
  • Task 1: A role play based on one topic allocated by the exam board.
  • Task 2: Questions based on a picture.
  • Task 3: Conversation based on 2 themes. (Theme 1 is chosen by the learner and Theme 2 is chosen by the exam board)

Listening

  • 25% (45 mins, 5 mins to read questions)

Reading

  • 25% (1 hour)
  • Includes a translation
  • (Adverts/emails/texts/blogs)

Examination: 100% exam at the end of year 11

  • 2 years (fast track)
  • GCSE

How it’s assessed

  • No Coursework – 100% Exam Based
  • 25% Listening, 25% Writing, 25% Reading, 25% Speaking
  • Some questions will be in Spanish
  • Literary extracts
  • Short translation in writing paper
  • Speaking assessment in April/May
  • No dictionaries allowed

Writing

  • 45 minutes (25%) (Includes a translation and two open questions to answer)

Speaking

  • 10 – 12 minutes. 12 minutes preparation time
  • Task 1: A role play based on one topic allocated by the exam board.
  • Task 2: Questions based on a picture.
  • Task 3: Conversation based on 2 themes. (Theme 1 is chosen by the learner and Theme 2 is chosen by the exam board)

Listening

  • 25% (45 mins, 5 mins to read questions)

Reading

  • 25% (1 hour)
  • Includes a translation
  • (Adverts/emails/texts/blogs)

Examination: 100% exam at the end of year 11

  • 2 years (fast track)
  • GCSE

How it’s assessed

  • No Coursework – 100% Exam Based
  • 25% Listening, 25% Writing, 25% Reading, 25% Speaking
  • Some questions will be in French
  • Literary extracts
  • Short translation in writing paper
  • Speaking assessment in April/May
  • No dictionaries allowed

Writing

  • 45 minutes (25%) (Includes a translation and two open questions to answer)

Speaking

  • 10 – 12 minutes. 12 minutes preparation time
  • Task 1: A role play based on one topic allocated by the exam board.
  • Task 2: Questions based on a picture.
  • Task 3: Conversation based on 2 themes. (Theme 1 is chosen by the learner and Theme 2 is chosen by the exam board)

Listening

  • 25% (45 mins, 5 mins to read questions)

Reading

  • 25% (1 hour)
  • Includes a translation
  • (Adverts/emails/texts/blogs)

Examination Board: OCR

Examination:

  • Exam x 3 – 100% at end of Y11
    • 1 x non calculator
    • 2 x non calculator

Topics Covered

Number.

Decimals, Place value and Rounding:

  • Find the upper and lower bounds of simple calculations
  • Estimate answers to calculations
  • Find minimum and maximum values
  • Understand the effects of multiplying by numbers between 0 and 1
  • Divide a number by a decimal such as 1 ÷ 0.2 and 2.8 divided by 0.07
  • Recognise accuracy in measurements given to the nearest whole unit
  • Estimate answers to calculations involving division
  • Multiply two decimals such as 2.4 × 0.7
  • Round a number to one significant figure
  • Add and subtract decimals
  • Round numbers to given powers of 10 and to given numbers of decimal places
  • Write down the place value of a digit, for example, what is the value of the 4 in 0.24?

Properties of Number:

  • Find the least common multiple (LCM) of two simple numbers
  • Find the highest common factor (HCF) of two simple numbers
  • Write a number as a product of prime factors
  • Find the reciprocal of a number
  • Find the factors of a number

Percentages:

  • Work out a percentage increase or decrease
  • Express one quantity as a percentage of another
  • Increase or decrease a quantity by a given percentage
  • Understand that percentage means ‘out of 100’
  • Work out a percentage of a given quantity

Calculations and Negative Numbers:

  • Solve numerical problems involving multiplication and division with numbers of any size using a calculator efficiently and appropriately
  • Multiply and divide negative integers
  • Add and subtract negative integers

FDP, Ratio and Proportion:

  • Solve more complex ratio and proportion problems, such as sharing out money between two groups in the ratio of their numbers
  • Solve ratio and proportion problems using the unitary method
  • Convert decimals to fractions and fractions to decimals
  • Compare percentages, fractions and decimals
  • Use map scales to find distance
  • Change a percentage to a fraction or a decimal and vice versa
  • Solve simple ratio and direct proportion problems

Powers, Indices, Standard Form and Surds:

  • Use index notation and index laws for positive and negative powers
  • Use the terms square, positive and negative square root, cube and cube root
  • Recall integer squares from 2×2 to 15×15 and the corresponding square roots
  • Recall the cubes of 2, 3, 4, 5 and 10
  • Calculate cubes and cube roots (with and without the use of a calculator)

Fractions:

  • Do calculations with mixed numbers
  • Do calculations with simple fractions involving division
  • Do calculations with simple fractions involving subtraction
  • Find one number as a fraction of another
  • Do calculations with simple fractions involving addition
  • Do calculations with simple fractions involving multiplication
  • Simplify fractions such as 4/20
  • Arrange fractions in order of size
  • Work out fractions of quantities such as 3/5 of £20

Algebra.

Expressions and Equations:

  • Multiply out expressions with brackets such as y(3y – 8)
  • Expand and simplify two expressions of the form (x + n)
  • Solve more complex linear equations such as 3x – 12 = 2(x – 5)
  • Solve linear equations involving fractions such as (7-x)/3=2
  • or 2x/3-x/4=5
  • Find a solution to a problem by forming an equation and solving it
  • Form and solve equations such as x3 + x = 12 using trial and improvement methods
  • Multiply out expressions with brackets such as 5(3x – 2)
  • Factorise expressions
  • Solve linear equations with unknowns on each side such as 3x – 4 = 5 + x
  • Solve linear equations with brackets such as 2(5x + 1) = 28
  • Simplify expressions with more than one variable such as 2a + 5b + a – 2b
  • Solve equations such as x/2=9 or 4x – 2 = 22
  • Write an expression from a problem
  • Simplify expressions with one variable such as a + 2a + 3a
  • Solve equations such as 4x = 24 and x – 3 = 7

Inequalities and Formulae:

  • Rearrange linear formulae such as s = 4q – 7
  • Solve inequalities such as 3x < 9 and 12 = 3n < 20
  • Solve linear inequalities such as 4x – 3 < 10 and 4x < 2x + 7
  • Represent sets of solutions on the number line
  • Substitute numbers into more complicated formulae such as C=(A-1)D/9
  • Substitute negative numbers into a simple formula
  • Use a simple formula such as P = 2w + 2h

Sequences:

  • Write the nth term of a sequence or a series of diagrams
  • Write the terms of a sequence or a series of diagrams given the nth term
  • Find a particular term in a sequence involving negative or fractional numbers
  • Write the term-to-term rule in a sequence involving negative or fractional numbers
  • Find a particular term in a sequence involving positive numbers
  • Write the term-to-term rule in a sequence involving positive numbers

Graphs:

  • Find the gradients of straight-line graphs
  • Draw graphs of harder quadratic functions such as y = x2 + 3x -5
  • Find the points of intersection of quadratic graphs with lines
  • Draw lines such as y = 2x + 3
  • Solve problems involving graphs, such as finding where the line y = x + 5 crosses the line y = 1
  • Draw graphs of simple quadratic functions such as y = 2×2 and y = x2 + 2
  • Draw lines such as x = 3 and y = x + 2
  • Interpret distance–time graphs
  • Plot the graphs of straight lines such as x = 3 and y = 4
  • Complete a table of values for equations such as y = 3x + 3 and draw the graph

Geometry

Perimeter, Area and Volume:

  • Solve problems involving circles such as finding the perimeter of a semicircle
  • Solve problems involving circles such as finding the area of a semicircle
  • Calculate volumes of triangular prisms, parallelogram-based prisms and cylinders
  • Solve problems involving surface areas of prisms and cylinders
  • Convert between measures of area
  • Convert between measures of volume

Speed, Distance, Time:

  • Solve more difficult speed problems
  • Understand and use compound measures such as speed and density
  • Calculate complex average speeds from distance–time graphs
  • Calculate simple average speeds from distance–time graphs

Angles:

  • Solve problems using angle and symmetry properties of polygons and properties of intersecting and parallel lines
  • Calculate exterior and interior angles of a regular polygon
  • Use Pythagoras’ theorem to find any hypotenuse or side of a right-angled triangle
  • Use Pythagoras’ theorem to find the height of an isosceles triangle
  • Use Pythagoras’ theorem in practical problems
  • Show that the angles of a triangle add up to 180° and use this to find angles
  • Show that an exterior angle of a triangle is equal to the sum of the interior opposite angles
  • Use angle properties of isosceles, equilateral and right-angled triangles

Properties of Shapes and Objects:

  • Classify a quadrilateral by geometric properties
  • Find the midpoint of a line segment
  • Use and understand coordinates in three dimensions

Constructions:

  • Construct the perpendicular from a point on a line
  • Construct angles of 60° and 90°
  • Construct the bisector of an angle
  • Construct accurately loci, such as those of points equidistant from two fixed points
  • Solve loci problems, such as identifying points less than 3 cm from a point P

Transformations:

  • Reflect shapes in the lines y = x and y = –x
  • Rotate shapes about any point
  • Describe fully reflections and rotations about any point
  • Find the centre of a rotation and describe it fully
  • Combine reflections and rotations
  • Translate a shape by a vector such as (4¦(-3))
  • Transform shapes by a combination of translation, reflection and rotation
  • Compare the area of an enlarged shape with the original shape
  • Enlarge a shape by a positive whole number or fractional scale factor

Statistics and Probability

Collecting Data and Sampling:

  • Identify possible sources of bias in the design and use of data collection sheets & questionnaires
  • Specify hypotheses and test them
  • Classify and know the difference between various types of data

Averages:

  • Find the mean for grouped data
  • Find the median and modal class for grouped data
  • Use measures of average and range to compare distributions and make inferences
  • Calculate the mean for a frequency distribution
  • Compare the mean and range of two distributions
  • Calculate the ‘fx’ column for a frequency distribution
  • Work out the range for a set of numbers
  • Calculate the mean for a set of numbers

Constructing and Interpreting Charts and Graphs:

  • Draw a line of best fit on the scatter graph by inspection
  • Construct a stem-and-leaf diagram (ordered)
  • Construct a frequency diagram
  • Interpret a time series graph
  • Draw a scatter graph by plotting points on a graph
  • Interpret the scatter graph
  • Construct a pie chart
  • Interpret a stem-and-leaf diagram

Probability:

  • Use relative frequency to find probabilities
  • Complete a tree diagram
  • Understand relative frequency as an estimate of probability
  • Use relative frequency to compare outcomes of experiments
  • Use a two-way table to find a probability
  • Understand mutually exclusive events
  • Use the fact that the probabilities of mutually exclusive events add up to 1
  • Understand the difference between experimental and theoretical probabilities
  • Understand and use relative frequency
  • Understand and use a probability scale
  • Express a probability as a fraction

Examination: 100% exam
Examination board: London Institute of Banking and Finance

Exam 1 Unit 1:

  • 20 stand-alone multiple-choice questions and 5 sets of stimulus material each with 3 associated questions (total marks 35);
  • 45 minute exam
  • 35 % online, on demand exam

Exam 2 Unit 2:

  • Unit 2: 15 stand-alone multiple-choice questions and 5 sets of stimulus material each with 4 associated questions (total marks 35).
  • 45 minute exam
  • 35 % online, on demand exam

Exam 3 Unit 3:

  • Unit 3: pre-release case study requiring written responses to 5 associated questions (total marks 30).
  • 30 marks
  • 30% written exam in Y11

Topics covered in Y10:

  • Unit 1 Finance, the Individual and Society

Topics covered in y11:

  • Unit 2 Practices of Managing Money
  • Unit 3 Financial Capability, Work and Enterprise

Examination: 25% exam & 75% Coursework

  • Coursework 1 Unit 1: 25 %
  • Coursework 2 Unit 3: 25 %
  • Coursework 3 Unit 8: 25 %
  • Exam 1 Unit 2: 25% written exam in Y11

Examination board: Edexcel

What’s assessed

  • Understand the costs involved in business and how businesses make a profit
    Understand how businesses plan for success
    Understand how businesses measure success and identify areas for improvement

How it’s assessed

  • Written exam: 1 hour
  • 50 marks

Questions

  • On onscreen test, multiple choice, and short answer

Topics covered in Y10:

  • Unit 1 – Enterprise in the Business World
  • Unit 3 – Promoting a Brand
  • Unit 8 – Recruitment, Selection and Employment

Topics covered in y11:

  • Unit 2 Finance for Business

Overview:

Learners will study the processes that use machines, tools and equipment to turn raw materials into new products.

Methods of assessment:

This qualification is divided into four sections with each section worth 25% of the overall marks available. They are as follows:

  • Engineering materials, processes and production (eExamination)
  • Preparing and planning for manufacture (coursework)
  • Computer-aided manufacturing (coursework)
  • Quality control of engineered products (coursework)

Topics covered in Y10:
Engineering manufacture is delivered and assessed in year 11.

Topics covered in Y11:
The engineering manufacture qualification enables learners to study the processes that use machines, tools and equipment to turn raw materials into new products. It also allows them to operate the tools and equipment used to make products from the requirements of a design specification, as well as use relevant computer applications such as CAD/CAM, and CNC equipment.

The coursework elements of this qualification are undertaken with our challenge partner Toyota. During this challenge learners will look at different methods of production and manufacture a standard component in a variety of ways. Alongside the practical skills developed, learners are required to demonstrate an understanding of engineering production drawings, quality control systems and lean manufacturing principles. A visit to either the Deeside or Burnaston manufacturing plants allow learners to how Toyota implement systems learners have been studying in their lessons. In addition to the coursework Toyota set a challenge for learners to solve focusing on developing and applying the lean manufacturing principles they have studied, teamwork and problem solving skills. Learners practice their communication skills by presenting their final solutions to Toyota.

Overview:

Learners will get the opportunity to develop a design specification and study the processes involved in designing new engineered products.

Methods of assessment:

This qualification is divided into four sections with each section worth 25% of the overall marks available. They are as follows:

  • Design briefs, design specifications and user requirements (examination)
  • Product analysis and research (coursework)
  • Developing and presenting engineering designs (coursework)
  • Design realisation (coursework)

Topics covered in Y10:
Engineering design is a process used to develop and enhance new products and systems as a response to market opportunities. This qualification is an opportunity for learners to develop a design specification and study the processes involved in designing new engineered products. They’ll use practical skills such as drawing, computer modelling and model making to communicate design ideas. The qualification also encourages them to consult with a client and, with its practical focus, will engage them in producing, testing and evaluating a prototype in the form of a model.

This qualification is undertaken with our challenge partner Rolls Royce whereby learners learn about the crucial stages of the design process. Learners are given the opportunity to research and investigate different types of pump systems, in particular the piston head, con-rod and gudgeon pin. Learners will develop their drawing skills using a range of drawing techniques in order to generate their own design proposals for improving the piston head design. Learners will generate final engineering drawings that will aid them in creating a production plan prior to manufacturing. Learners are introduced to a variety of tools and equipment which will enable them to safely and competently manufacture a model of their final design.

Topics covered in Y11:
Engineering design is delivered and assessed in year 10.

Overview:

Principles in Engineering and Engineering Business will equip learners with engineering knowledge of how engineered products and systems are designed, built and maintained to perform consistently at an optimum level.

Methods of assessment:

This qualification is divided into four sections with each section worth 25% of the overall qualification. They are as follows:

  • Engineering principles (examination)
  • The engineered business world (coursework)
  • Sustainable engineering (coursework)
  • Optimising performance in engineering systems and products (coursework)

Topics covered in Y10:
The qualification in Principles in Engineering and Engineering Business will equip learners with engineering knowledge of how engineered products and systems are designed, built and maintained to perform consistently at an optimum level. It will provide opportunities to develop skills such as research, planning, working with others and communicating effectively. It will promote transferable skills and tools to improve learning in other subjects with the aims of enhancing employability and contributing to personal development and future economic well-being. A practical approach to teaching and learning will provide learners with knowledge in engineering technology and underpin a valid approach to the assessment of their skills, challenging learners to develop scientific and mathematical techniques, encouraging critical thinking and apply dextrous skills through engaging practical experiences.

This qualification is run in conjunction with JCB where the learners are provided with an opportunity to take part in a challenge that relates to a JCB 3CX – The challenge looks at materials, sustainability and manufacturing processes used within the vehicle and learners will take part in practical maintenance procedures compromising of changing an oil filter and pulley belt on the engine. The challenge will also involve a logistical design task where learners are given a problem where they have to design a scoop to move various products from once are to another using custom built JCB resources. This combined with exclusive visits to the ‘JCB World Headquarters’ provides a valuable and rich learning experience for all year 10 learners.

Topics covered in Y11:
Principles in Engineering and Engineering Business is delivered and assessed in year 10.

Overview:

Learners will explore computer and microprocessor applications. They’ll learn how systems are used in engineering environments such as product design, automated manufacturing, maintenance and stock control

Methods of assessment:

This qualification is divided into four sections with each section worth 25% of the overall qualification. They are as follows:

  • Electronic principles (examination)
  • Simulate, construct and test electronic circuits (coursework)
  • Engineering applications of computers (coursework)
  • Process control systems (coursework)

Topics covered in Y10:
Engineering design is delivered and assessed in year 11.

Topics covered in Y11:
Systems control in engineering is the study of microprocessor control that uses sensors, feedback and actuators that constantly adjust for a desired performance. Through this qualification, learners will explore these computer and microprocessor applications. They’ll learn how systems are used in engineering environments such as product design, automated manufacturing, maintenance and stock control. They’ll also take part in engaging practical tasks such as producing simple electronic circuits, testing the operation of circuits, and designing and testing a simple control system.

The coursework elements of this qualification are undertaken with our challenge partners ULTRA-PMES and Network Rail. During this challenge learners will complete a variety of activities. This will include gaining an understanding of electronic components; what they are, what they do and how they work within a circuit. How circuits are constructed and how they can be tested. Investigating the control systems used within everyday products. A task based around an automated barrier crossing involving CAD simulation and designing fault finding systems to test and maintain the control system.

In addition, all year 10 and 11 learners will undertake:

  • Physical Education
  • Citizenship
  • Enterprise Education
  • Careers Education and Guidance
  • Religious Education
  • Personal, Health and Social Education
  • Work Experience

For further information on our curriculum, please contact us.